Property Coin: Crypto Investors Looking to Fix and Flip

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Is blockchain the future of real estate transactions? So far, only a few contracts have closed through Bitcoin or other forms of cryptocurrency; however, with offerings being introduced, that could quickly change.

Aperture Real Estate Ventures, a real estate technology and investment firm based in Los Angeles, Calif., claims it has launched the first-ever real estate-backed digital currency, Property Coin. Aperture’s model relies on coin proceeds to power its real estate investment business, which focuses on acquiring distressed residential properties and rehabbing them, as well as writing loans to smaller investors who have the same objective.

“Unlike many cryptocurrency offerings, Property Coin’s proposition is straightforward,” said Andrew Jewett, co-CEO of Aperture, in a statement. “One-hundred percent of the net proceeds from sales of Property Coins will be used to invest in properties and loans identified by our proprietary software and our experienced team. Accordingly, Property Coin is designed to be 100-percent backed by real estate assets, giving each coin holder a fractional economic interest in the investments made by Aperture or its affiliates with the net proceeds realized from the sale of Property Coins.”

When buying Property Coins, investors are not only receiving a fractional percentage of assets owned by Property Coin and its entities, but coin holders will also own 50 percent of the net profits from the loan and property investments.

Built on Ethereum—another blockchain-based cryptocurrency not far behind Bitcoin in popularity—Property Coin is completely backed by U.S. real estate assets. Aperture asserts that all investments will be made using the experience of Wall Street and real estate investment professionals while also incorporating industry technology powered by data science.

Property Coin’s public sale began on Feb. 26 for its initial offering at 50 U.S. dollars each, or through the equivalent value of Ethereum or Bitcoin currency. Property Coin purchases are restricted to Accredited Investors who buy at least $1,000 worth of coins.

“We’re very excited to be able to offer this proprietary formula to cryptocurrency investors who want access to a diversified, tech-powered, professionally managed portfolio of real estate assets through Property Coin,” said Matt Miles, co-CEO of Aperture.

Of course, volatility remains an issue with blockchain technology. Aperture is relying on its reinvestment strategy to add token stability and to create renewed interest in the real estate investment market.

Stay tuned to RISMedia for more developments.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Property Coin: Crypto Investors Looking to Fix and Flip appeared first on RISMedia.

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6 Tax Breaks for Pet Owners You Can Actually Get

(TNS)—You love your pet—he’s like your child, after all—but the IRS doesn’t quite see it that way. The IRS takes the position that the money you spend on Fido or Fluffy is generally a personal expense. Your pet gives you pleasure like that latte you bought on your way to work this morning, but just like your cup of coffee isn’t tax deductible, neither is your pet.

There are a few loopholes, however. You might be able to deduct costs related to your pet if he serves another purpose in addition to accepting your undying devotion—and if you can prove it.

  1. Guard Dogs
    Generally, it’s difficult to claim your pet as a business expense, but if your pet guards your business location, you might be able to deduct the costs of keeping him fed and healthy.

“The IRS has taken a fairly hard-nosed stance when it comes to deducting the cost of animals as business expenses—and the courts have agreed with them,” says Micah Fraim, a CPA in Roanoke, Va., and author of “The Little Big Small Business Book.” “But one area that has been consistently upheld is when you own a guard dog. In fact, in Raleigh Cox and Brenda J. Cox v. Commissioner, the IRS didn’t even attempt to disallow deductions for a guard dog. The business was in a bad part of town, and the IRS felt that it was a legitimate expense.”

How to Get the Deduction
You might have a hard time convincing the IRS that your Yorkie or teacup Chihuahua serves in this capacity.

“Size and breed do matter here,” says Fraim. “A mastiff, pit bull or other large breed would be believable. A Maltese or Chihuahua would not.”

Kristina Grasso, master tax advisor with H&R Block, says you might be able to deduct guard dog-related expenses—dog food, training and veterinary bills—on Schedule C if he guards your work premise. So, make sure you “keep records about the dog’s hours and work-related purpose,” she says.

  1. Cats Used for Pest Control
    You might also be able to deduct costs associated with your kitty who keeps your business property free of mice, rats and other vermin.

“Cats or other animals that are kept primarily for pest control are also deductible,” says Fraim.

Fraim noted that in Samuel T. Seawright, et ux. v. Commissioner, the petitioners were entitled to a $300 business expense deduction for cat food.

“The couple owned a junkyard and put the food out to attract feral cats,” he says. “The court upheld the deduction as cats were there ‘to deter snakes and rats.’”

Choose wisely when picking which type of cat prowls your business.

How to Get the Deduction
Remember that if you’re trying to claim your working pets to deduct business expenses, you’ll likely have to convince the IRS that keeping the animal is “ordinary and necessary.” In other words, “hiring” a cat or dog must be “common and accepted in your trade or business.” And, it must be “helpful and appropriate.”

  1. Offsetting Hobby Income
    If you make money showing your pet—which the IRS might consider hobby income—you might be able to claim a tax break for related expenses.

“Pets used in hobbies, such as show dogs, might be deductible,” says Grasso. “If the dog wins prize money in the endeavor, then the expenses incurred to train, show, etc., are deductible up to the winnings.”

You can expet to receive a 1099 at the end of the year if you earn hobby income.

“You can also deduct related expenses up to the amount of income earned on Schedule A of the 1040,” says Fraim.

How to Get the Deduction
The process to deduct these expenses can get tricky.

“You must itemize to take the deduction at all, which many taxpayers do not,” says Fraim. And, some restrictions apply that might not result in substantial tax savings.

“These deductions are subject to a threshold of 2 percent of your adjusted gross income or AGI,” says Fraim. “For easy math, let’s say you made $1,000 from pet shows, had $3,000 in expenses and your AGI is $100,000…You can deduct $1,000 of expenses—not the full $3,000—ecause you’re only allowed to take a deduction up to the amount of income earned. Even then, you don’t actually get any tax break.”

That $1,000 is less than 2 percent of your AGI, so you actually lose $2,000 from the pet shows—and you still have to pay taxes on the $1,000 in income you earned.

“Two percent of a lower AGI is an easier threshold to execute,” says Grasso. So, the lower your AGI, the more likely it becomes that this tax deduction for hobby-related expenses will result in more tax savings.

  1. Foster Pet Parent Deductions
    If you foster animals, you might be able to take advantage of tax benefits for charitable contributions.

“Any expenses you incur caring for foster animals from a qualified nonprofit are deductible on Schedule A as charitable donations,” says Fraim.

These must be unreimbursed expenses if you want to get the deduction, though, Grasso adds. And, the expenses should go toward caring for these animals, such as pet food, supplies and veterinary bills.

“Thankfully, most of these organizations provide the medical care and food for these animals,” says Fraim, “but any expenses paid out of pocket that are necessary for their care that are not provided for or reimbursed are deductible.”

What about if you volunteer at a shelter or rescue organization?

“Keep track of mileage for trips made to further the organization’s work because this is deductible at 14 cents per mile,” says Grasso.

How to Get the Deduction
When it comes to fostering animals from municipal shelters, both Fraim and Grasso say to be careful. According to Fraim, most are not 501(c)(3)s and do not qualify for these types of tax deductions, unless they’re somehow tied to a charity.

“Some private agencies take on responsibility for animal control (law enforcement) functions or handle sheltering for a municipal animal control department by contracting with one or more municipalities,” says Grasso. “Thus, if the private agency is set up as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, the volunteers should qualify for any applicable deductions.”

Still, “people should foster animals because it increases the animal’s chances of being placed in permanent, forever homes and the animals get needed socialization—not because it potentially gets them a tax deduction,” she adds.

  1. Guide Dogs and Service Animals
    Medical expenses are tax deductible if you itemize. Let’s say your pet helps you in a health-related capacity. If so, you’ll likely get a tax break.

You can also include the costs of purchasing and training guide dogs for the blind or hearing impaired. This also includes veterinary, food and grooming expenses. Pets are also used in therapy, such as in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. These animals are covered as well, say Fraim and Grasso.

How to Get the Deduction
“Make sure to get a prescription from your doctor—or some other documentation that shows your medical necessity—prior to obtaining any pet that you claim,” says Grasso. Otherwise, “the IRS may conclude that your pet does not meet the requirements to deduct these pet expenses. Keep any documentation that shows how the animal was specially trained to help you with your medical condition, too.”

Also, the IRS doesn’t consider Fido to be a therapy dog unless he’s been trained and certified.

“The animal must be trained or certified as treatment for a diagnosed illness or condition for the IRS to approve the deduction,” says Grasso.

You don’t actually have to use the dog yourself to get a deduction, though. If you raise dogs for a charitable organization such as Guide Dogs for the Blind, costs associated with providing for them qualify as a charitable deduction, as well.

Taking advantage of these types of medical and charitable deductions related to animals can help you save a lot of money on your taxes this year.

  1. Moving Expenses
    The IRS won’t let you claim your pet as a dependent—but it’s not so heartless as to make you leave him behind if you’re forced to move due to work.

You can deduct costs associated with transferring your pet to your new home, but there are some requirements you have to follow, according to the IRS.

How to Get the Deduction

  • Your move must be closely related to the start of your work
  • You have to pass the distance test
  • You have to pass the time test

For example, your new workplace must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your old workplace was. So, if your old workplace was only 10 miles away from your old home, your new workplace must be at least 60 miles from your old home. And if you’re an employee, you must work full-time for 39 weeks or more during the first year after you relocate.

Once you satisfy the IRS requirements, you can deduct the cost of shipping your household pets to your new home, along with other move-related expenses.

GOBankingRates.com is a leading portal for personal finance news and features, offering visitors the latest information on everything from interest rates to strategies on saving money, managing a budget and getting out of debt.

©2018 GOBankingRates.com, a ConsumerTrack web property
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post 6 Tax Breaks for Pet Owners You Can Actually Get appeared first on RISMedia.

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6 Tax Breaks for Pet Owners You Can Actually Get

(TNS)—You love your pet—he’s like your child, after all—but the IRS doesn’t quite see it that way. The IRS takes the position that the money you spend on Fido or Fluffy is generally a personal expense. Your pet gives you pleasure like that latte you bought on your way to work this morning, but just like your cup of coffee isn’t tax deductible, neither is your pet.

There are a few loopholes, however. You might be able to deduct costs related to your pet if he serves another purpose in addition to accepting your undying devotion—and if you can prove it.

  1. Guard Dogs
    Generally, it’s difficult to claim your pet as a business expense, but if your pet guards your business location, you might be able to deduct the costs of keeping him fed and healthy.

“The IRS has taken a fairly hard-nosed stance when it comes to deducting the cost of animals as business expenses—and the courts have agreed with them,” says Micah Fraim, a CPA in Roanoke, Va., and author of “The Little Big Small Business Book.” “But one area that has been consistently upheld is when you own a guard dog. In fact, in Raleigh Cox and Brenda J. Cox v. Commissioner, the IRS didn’t even attempt to disallow deductions for a guard dog. The business was in a bad part of town, and the IRS felt that it was a legitimate expense.”

How to Get the Deduction
You might have a hard time convincing the IRS that your Yorkie or teacup Chihuahua serves in this capacity.

“Size and breed do matter here,” says Fraim. “A mastiff, pit bull or other large breed would be believable. A Maltese or Chihuahua would not.”

Kristina Grasso, master tax advisor with H&R Block, says you might be able to deduct guard dog-related expenses—dog food, training and veterinary bills—on Schedule C if he guards your work premise. So, make sure you “keep records about the dog’s hours and work-related purpose,” she says.

  1. Cats Used for Pest Control
    You might also be able to deduct costs associated with your kitty who keeps your business property free of mice, rats and other vermin.

“Cats or other animals that are kept primarily for pest control are also deductible,” says Fraim.

Fraim noted that in Samuel T. Seawright, et ux. v. Commissioner, the petitioners were entitled to a $300 business expense deduction for cat food.

“The couple owned a junkyard and put the food out to attract feral cats,” he says. “The court upheld the deduction as cats were there ‘to deter snakes and rats.’”

Choose wisely when picking which type of cat prowls your business.

How to Get the Deduction
Remember that if you’re trying to claim your working pets to deduct business expenses, you’ll likely have to convince the IRS that keeping the animal is “ordinary and necessary.” In other words, “hiring” a cat or dog must be “common and accepted in your trade or business.” And, it must be “helpful and appropriate.”

  1. Offsetting Hobby Income
    If you make money showing your pet—which the IRS might consider hobby income—you might be able to claim a tax break for related expenses.

“Pets used in hobbies, such as show dogs, might be deductible,” says Grasso. “If the dog wins prize money in the endeavor, then the expenses incurred to train, show, etc., are deductible up to the winnings.”

You can expet to receive a 1099 at the end of the year if you earn hobby income.

“You can also deduct related expenses up to the amount of income earned on Schedule A of the 1040,” says Fraim.

How to Get the Deduction
The process to deduct these expenses can get tricky.

“You must itemize to take the deduction at all, which many taxpayers do not,” says Fraim. And, some restrictions apply that might not result in substantial tax savings.

“These deductions are subject to a threshold of 2 percent of your adjusted gross income or AGI,” says Fraim. “For easy math, let’s say you made $1,000 from pet shows, had $3,000 in expenses and your AGI is $100,000…You can deduct $1,000 of expenses—not the full $3,000—ecause you’re only allowed to take a deduction up to the amount of income earned. Even then, you don’t actually get any tax break.”

That $1,000 is less than 2 percent of your AGI, so you actually lose $2,000 from the pet shows—and you still have to pay taxes on the $1,000 in income you earned.

“Two percent of a lower AGI is an easier threshold to execute,” says Grasso. So, the lower your AGI, the more likely it becomes that this tax deduction for hobby-related expenses will result in more tax savings.

  1. Foster Pet Parent Deductions
    If you foster animals, you might be able to take advantage of tax benefits for charitable contributions.

“Any expenses you incur caring for foster animals from a qualified nonprofit are deductible on Schedule A as charitable donations,” says Fraim.

These must be unreimbursed expenses if you want to get the deduction, though, Grasso adds. And, the expenses should go toward caring for these animals, such as pet food, supplies and veterinary bills.

“Thankfully, most of these organizations provide the medical care and food for these animals,” says Fraim, “but any expenses paid out of pocket that are necessary for their care that are not provided for or reimbursed are deductible.”

What about if you volunteer at a shelter or rescue organization?

“Keep track of mileage for trips made to further the organization’s work because this is deductible at 14 cents per mile,” says Grasso.

How to Get the Deduction
When it comes to fostering animals from municipal shelters, both Fraim and Grasso say to be careful. According to Fraim, most are not 501(c)(3)s and do not qualify for these types of tax deductions, unless they’re somehow tied to a charity.

“Some private agencies take on responsibility for animal control (law enforcement) functions or handle sheltering for a municipal animal control department by contracting with one or more municipalities,” says Grasso. “Thus, if the private agency is set up as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, the volunteers should qualify for any applicable deductions.”

Still, “people should foster animals because it increases the animal’s chances of being placed in permanent, forever homes and the animals get needed socialization—not because it potentially gets them a tax deduction,” she adds.

  1. Guide Dogs and Service Animals
    Medical expenses are tax deductible if you itemize. Let’s say your pet helps you in a health-related capacity. If so, you’ll likely get a tax break.

You can also include the costs of purchasing and training guide dogs for the blind or hearing impaired. This also includes veterinary, food and grooming expenses. Pets are also used in therapy, such as in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. These animals are covered as well, say Fraim and Grasso.

How to Get the Deduction
“Make sure to get a prescription from your doctor—or some other documentation that shows your medical necessity—prior to obtaining any pet that you claim,” says Grasso. Otherwise, “the IRS may conclude that your pet does not meet the requirements to deduct these pet expenses. Keep any documentation that shows how the animal was specially trained to help you with your medical condition, too.”

Also, the IRS doesn’t consider Fido to be a therapy dog unless he’s been trained and certified.

“The animal must be trained or certified as treatment for a diagnosed illness or condition for the IRS to approve the deduction,” says Grasso.

You don’t actually have to use the dog yourself to get a deduction, though. If you raise dogs for a charitable organization such as Guide Dogs for the Blind, costs associated with providing for them qualify as a charitable deduction, as well.

Taking advantage of these types of medical and charitable deductions related to animals can help you save a lot of money on your taxes this year.

  1. Moving Expenses
    The IRS won’t let you claim your pet as a dependent—but it’s not so heartless as to make you leave him behind if you’re forced to move due to work.

You can deduct costs associated with transferring your pet to your new home, but there are some requirements you have to follow, according to the IRS.

How to Get the Deduction

  • Your move must be closely related to the start of your work
  • You have to pass the distance test
  • You have to pass the time test

For example, your new workplace must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your old workplace was. So, if your old workplace was only 10 miles away from your old home, your new workplace must be at least 60 miles from your old home. And if you’re an employee, you must work full-time for 39 weeks or more during the first year after you relocate.

Once you satisfy the IRS requirements, you can deduct the cost of shipping your household pets to your new home, along with other move-related expenses.

GOBankingRates.com is a leading portal for personal finance news and features, offering visitors the latest information on everything from interest rates to strategies on saving money, managing a budget and getting out of debt.

©2018 GOBankingRates.com, a ConsumerTrack web property
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post 6 Tax Breaks for Pet Owners You Can Actually Get appeared first on RISMedia.

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$87,000 :: 50036 S Jimmy Ct, Chesterfield Township MI, 48047

Property Photo

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,088 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 02/26/18, Last Updated: 02/27/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 31340904
Community: Chesterfield Twp (50009)
Tract: Donner Meadows
Status: Active

Welcome home to this 2 Bed, 1 1/2 bath townhouse style condo in Chesterfield. Large master bedroom with huge walk-in closet. Second bedroom and shared bath upstairs. Main floor has a large living room with big picture window and doorwall accessing patio with a park like setting yard. Tons of privacy for condo living. Half bath and laundry room are just off the kitchen leading you to the attached garage. Shopping, dining, entertainment, freeway and more are all within one mile. L’Anse Creuse Schools. All appliances are included.

Listed with KW Platinum


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Volatile Market Threatens Retirement Real Estate

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The stock market has been on a volatile patch after plunging nearly 1,600 points at the beginning of February—and, while stable now, consumers and investors are watching closely. With many public pension plans tied to stocks, the incoming retirement community is hoping for a full recovery to recoup losses.

Many public pensions have already reported a loss. The California Public Employees’ Retirement System—the largest public pension fund in the nation—lost $18.5 billion in value over 10 trading days at the beginning of the month, according to the Wall Street Journal. While diversifying from traditional stocks and bonds decreases the risk of massive losses during a market drop, investing in alternative assets can introduce complex selling regulations and added fees.

Millions of government workers are relying on these plans, and with various states in a pension shortfall, employees are at risk of losing much-needed funds. The Wall Street Journal reports that most pension funds need to earn between 7-8 percent each year in order to pay for future benefits. According to Kiplinger, a few states are struggling to meet this goal: Illinois, Connecticut and Kentucky need to recover half of their estimated liabilities. In order to meet these objectives, hired firms are setting aggressive investment targets, which can potentially fund these accounts at a quicker pace, or may cause a steep fall-off, depending on stock market activity.

While most pension plans do not provide enough funds to financially carry an individual through their retirement, for many, they are the primary benefit they will rely on. For 30 percent of public-sector workers in 12 states, Social Security is not an option, according to CNN Money. The inability to control which assets their employer’s hired firm decides to invest in can be frightening for soon-to-be retirees who are watching funds diminish in the wake of this month’s market downturn.

What does this mean for real estate?

Future retirees, for one, may not have as many options when it comes to housing and paying off existing mortgages. Retirement-aged consumers who owe on their mortgage and do not receive the necessary funds to pay their debt, in addition to living expenses, may find themselves in a difficult situation. Individuals that were initially planning on downsizing and/or investing in a vacation property may find they need to refinance or risk losing their home to foreclosure or bankruptcy. These public pension plans in relation to stock market activity may also prompt homeowners to stay in their homes and at their jobs longer to secure more funds and ensure a financially safe future. With less downsizing, market inventory may be affected, creating shortages for move-up buyers.

With pension funds dwindling, the Public Pension Project—created by the Urban Institute’s Program on Retirement Policy and State and Local Finance Initiative—is working toward reform by examining current public pension trends and activity throughout the U.S. A State of Retirement map compiles this data to present detailed state-by-state information on plan rules.

Firms are adapting to the volatile market, selling off stocks and diversifying where needed, but only time will tell if these are sound investment decisions that will provide enough funds for the millions of Americans that need this income for their retirement and future real estate needs.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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Hot Home Trend: Go Big With Your Tile

By Melissa Dittmann Tracey, REALTOR® Magazine

Supersized tiles are making over more floors, and this may be welcome news to many homeowners. Large format tiles means less grout to clean. The large tile trend may be partially motivated out of function, not just aesthetics.

More homeowners are experimenting with larger tile sizes, whether with porcelain, ceramic, or vinyl flooring.

Tile squares may be about 12 inches or so in most standard kitchen floors. But now sizes up to 24 inches or more are catching on.

Besides the easier-to-clean aspects of this, the larger tile squares often can make a space look bigger. That’s because there are less grout lines breaking up a floor into boxy squares, which leads to the perceptions of elongated spaces. (Another tip from designers in elongating a space with your tile: Be sure to select a grout color that most closely matches the color of your tile. That will also help make your floors look more expansive.)

The larger tile formats are popping up in kitchen flooring and as in bathrooms surrounding the tub or shower. Designers say the larger formats offer a more modern, “clean lines” vibe to a room’s flooring.

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IRS Clarifies Home Equity Loan Tax Deductions Under New Law

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This year’s tax season is bringing to light taxpayer confusion surrounding The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, which could impact homeowners in next year’s tax filing. The IRS is taking steps to clarify what the new provisions mean for the real estate industry and homeowners.

One of the most misunderstood provisions in the new tax law expires in 2026 and prohibits the deduction of interest paid on home equity lines of credit and home equity loans except when the funds are used to substantially improve the taxpayer’s home. The IRS recently issued a statement clarifying that the deduction has not been removed, but is instead available under new home improvement restrictions:

“…despite newly-enacted restrictions on home mortgages, taxpayers can often still deduct interest on a home equity loan, home equity line of credit (HELOC) or second mortgage, regardless of how the loan is labelled,” according to an IRS release.

Homeowners must continue to meet the requirements of the previous law, which stated the loan must be secured by the taxpayer’s main or second residence, and the funds cannot surpass the cost of the home.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) President Elizabeth Mendenhall commended the IRS on its efforts to clarify how homeowners can take advantage of the HELOC tax provision.

“The National Association of REALTORS® is pleased with the IRS announcement clarifying and confirming that under the new tax law owners can continue to deduct the interest on a home equity loan, line of credit or second mortgage when the proceeds are used to substantially improve their residence,” said Mendenhall in a statement. “There has been much confusion on this issue, and the continued deductibility will bring real benefits to those who choose to take on remodeling projects to bring more resale value to their home or gain equity that may have been lost during the downturn.”

Randy Noel, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders NAHB), also supported keeping this provision within the new law.

“The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) applauds [this] announcement by the IRS clarifying that households can take a tax deduction on a home equity loan or home equity line of credit if the loan is used for home improvements,” said Noel in a statement. “This is a major victory for remodelers and for homeowners who want to invest in their homes. NAHB has been pushing hard for this outcome since December, when The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 was signed into law. We will continue to work with Congress and the Administration as they hammer out the details of the new tax law.”

Stay tuned to RISMedia for more developments.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post IRS Clarifies Home Equity Loan Tax Deductions Under New Law appeared first on RISMedia.

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$160,683 :: 51845 RIVARD RD, New Baltimore MI, 48047

Property Photo

4 beds, 4 baths
Home size: 2,160 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 11/19/15, Last Updated: 02/24/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 20727236
Community: New Baltimore (50010)
Tract: COVINGTON PARK SUB NO 2
Status: Sold

Listing Broker and Seller assume no responsibility and make no guarantees, representations, warranties (express, implied or otherwise) as to the availability or accuracy of information contained herein. ?4.5% buyer premium charged to buyer at closing.? SHOWING ID: 0007424116044

Listed with Owners.com


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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$166,000 :: 48703 W RANCH, New Baltimore MI, 48051

Property Photo

3 beds, 1 bath
Home size: 1,425 sq ft
Lot Size: 25,264 sq ft
Added: 03/15/16, Last Updated: 02/24/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 21116045
Community: Chesterfield Twp (50009)
Tract: RANCH ACRES
Status: Sold

WOW & Welcome Home are the only words for this amazing Chesterfield Brick Ranch! Home feat custom remodel in 2013.Kitchen feat soft close cabinets & drawers,granite counters,custom blacksplash,high end stainless appliances,& ceramic floors.Formal dining w/ceramic floors,wires for surround sound & lots of natural light through bay window.Large great room with cathedral ceiling w/accent lighting,high end laminate floors,crown molding,wired surround sound,built in entertainment center & french doors w/built in blinds leading to 5-6 yr old concrete patio.Bathroom updated with new vanity incl dbl sinks,granite counters,custom tiled shower,toilet,fixtures,& ceramic floors.Six panel doors,crown molding,recessed lighting,fresh/neutral paint throughout.Oversized 2.5 car heated garage w/vaulted ceilings,new insulated door & newer motor.Newer vinyl windows.Dimensional shingle roof.Huge 20×12 shed on slab w/attic storage.Eight person hot tub.Fully fenced 110×220 yard w/no rear neighbors. MUST SEE!

Listed with Community Choice Realty Inc


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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$109,900 :: 49182 FULLER RD, Chesterfield MI, 48051

Property Photo

3 beds, 1 bath
Home size: 1,296 sq ft
Lot Size: 41,817 sq ft
Added: 12/11/17, Last Updated: 02/23/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 21396860
Community: Chesterfield Twp (50009)
Tract: S/P # 22 FULLER’S SMALL F
The price of this listing was last reduced on 1/30/2018 by 19%
Status: Active

GREAT PROPERTY IN THE CITY OF CHESTERFIELD!! COME TAKE A LOOK AT THIS 3 BEDROOM BUNGALOW FEATURES 1 FULL BATH, NICE SIZE LIVING ROOM , & KITCHEN. W/ 2 CAR DETACHED GARAGE!! DON’T MISS OUT!!CASH offers only .Bank of America employees, spouse or domestic partner, household members, business partners and insiders are prohibited from purchasing. PROPERTY SOLD IN AS IS CONDITION. BUYER AND BUYERS AGENT TO VERIFY ALL INFO.

Listed with RE/MAX Leading Edge


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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